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ICFA 39 200 Years of the Fantastic: Celebrating Frankenstein and Mary Shelley

An audience needs something stronger than a pretty little love story. So, why shouldn’t I write of monsters? (Mary Shelley, the character, from the 1935 film Bride of Frankenstein) Darlings! You won’t believe it. (Well, you might). Here’s the most amazing news: in March next year, I’ll be a Guest of … Continue reading

Author : nike

Lawnmowing poetry

Asa Gray wrote Increase Lapham: pay particular attention to my pets, the grasses. — by Lorine Niedecker (1940). This semester, I’m teaching a poetry course for third year undergraduates. I’ve never been one  to divide a semester into the usual kind of weeks (week one: line, week two: stanza, week … Continue reading

Filed under : On Reading , On Teaching
Author : nike

seventy-three (the arc of a bird’s flight)

after we are dead nobody will remember the way you looked at me this afternoon or the way your hand / grazed by sunlight perfectly described the arc of a bird’s flight someone else will walk along this road / and see that same tree / older now and bent … Continue reading

Author : nike

seventy-two (landslide)

At 2:30 pm today, a huge part of my life is ending. And all day (all week, all month) I’ve been struck by every fucking cliché that people use to comfort or sustain themselves through such moments. They just sneak up on me, wash through me. They’re as insistent and melodramatic … Continue reading

Author : nike
Comments : 4 Comments

seventy (magenta drift)

For Rebecca Jessen Once upon a time I promised to tell you a story about the past (you are going to write about the future). At the film screening, a woman says that this film will never be shown again. It is showing signs of magenta drift. In the future, … Continue reading

Author : nike
Comments : One Comment

sixty-nine (Atropos 3)

Before the sun and night and the blue sea, I vow To stand faithfully by all that is brave and beautiful; To seek adventure and having discovered aught of wonder, or delight, of merriment or loveliness, To share it freely with my comrades, the Band of Happy Rowers. [1]   I … Continue reading

Author : nike

‘Libussa’ by Johann Karl August Musäus

‘Libussa’ is one of the tales related/retold by Johann Karl August Musäus, and first translated into English by Thomas Carlyle. It was published in Carlyle’s three-volume publication Translations from the German (1827). The tale below is a transcription of Carlyle’s translation (not one of my own translations). The tale was part of Musäus’s 1728 … Continue reading

Author : nike

Salt Lane witches, wagons and ditches

In my 2013 speculative fiction novel, Rupetta (2013), Henri, a history student, completes a small thesis after undertaking research into the lives of a pair of women know as the Salt Lane Witches. This post provides a few little tidbits of the intertextual backstory that went into the (re)writing of those characters and their (fairy) … Continue reading

Author : nike

The women (wo)men don’t see

At a recent conference on excess and desire in twentieth- and twenty-first century women’s writing, one of the presenters quoted from Natalie Kon-Yu’s 2016 essay, in Overland, ‘A testicular hit-list of literary big cats‘. In particular, she quoted from the section in which Kon-Yu describes the depiction of Jake Whyte’s … Continue reading

Author : nike
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